Learn Yoruba for Beginners – Lesson 2 : How to greet someone in yoruba

Introduction

How you greet someone may vary depending on the time of the day. Although the following is a list of the commonly known greeting phrases, one needs to add or remove certain pronouns depending on the other person listening to you.

 

kúùrọ̀lẹ́

good evening

 

káàárọ̀

good morning

 

káàsán

good afternoon

 

káalẹ́ 

dàárọ̀

good night/ late in the evening

 

Ó dàbọ̀

Good bye

 

Good morning

This form of expression should be used before 10AM.

 

Formal

Good morning ma.

Ẹ káàárọ̀ mà.

Good morning sir.

Ẹ káàárọ̀ sà.

 

Informal

Good morning.

Òo, Káàárọ̀.

 

Good afternoon

Based on experience, this expression may be used after lunch, so 12PM.

Good afternoon ma.

Ẹ káàsán mà.

Good afternoon sir.

Ẹ káàsán sà.

 

Informal

Good afternoon.

Káàsán.

 

Good evening / Good night

This gets a bit tricky. The “kúùrọ̀lẹ́ “ fits more between 4PM and 8PM but afterwards it would make more sense to use “káalẹ́ “. Don’t be afraid to mess it up, besides you are a beginner. It is okay.

 

Option 1

Good evening ma.

Ẹ kúùrọ̀lẹ́ mà.

Good evening sir.

Ẹ kúùrọ̀lẹ́ sà.

 

Informal

Good evening.

Òo, Kúùrọ̀lẹ́.

 

Option 2 ( Good night )

Good evening ma.

Ẹ káalẹ́ mà.

Good evening sir.

Ẹ káalẹ́ sà.

 

Informal

Good evening.

Òo, Káalẹ́.

Òo, dàárọ̀

 

Goodbye

Formal

Goodbye ma.

Ó dàbọ̀ mà.

Goodbye sir.

Ó dàbọ̀ sà.

 

Informal

Òo, dàbọ̀.

 

Editor notes

I am also a beginner in Yoruba, so please bear with me. 

 

References

 

 


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